HARV's Favorite CD's

HR photos updated 11/24/10 (Finally!)

"...being an incomplete list and reviews of some of my very favorite CD's, ones I never seem to get sick of. Some of them I have been listening to for years, and some of them are new discoveries. Some of them are by well-known people, some by obscure artists. These are CD's that I like in their entirety, and that I am thilled to own and listen to repeatedly.

I have flagged the new listings to this page in the NEW column (that were new since the last revision in 2006 I think!), and have added the "GUARANTEE" on some of them. Which is "If you buy this and don't like it I will personally buy it from you and give it to a friend."

I hope this helps some of you who are always looking for good music, and maybe will help some of the artists get some new fans.

This list is alphabetical by first letter of artist's name. Someday I might find the time to compile a list of LP's I like, since there are still a lot of great ones that remain unavailable on CD. (Such as Johnny Cash's Blue Train and Wayne New Sings Hit Songs (yes!) " (Harvey Reid 2010)

I have now included a new page of the track sheets from some of my more recent road tapes, for those who are curious about finding some good new music or finding out what I listen to on the road. Those are good songs. This is a list of good albums.

ARTIST ALBUM LABEL YEAR COMMENTS NEW GUAR
Archie Fisher Will Ye Gang Love Green Linnet 1976 Best of his many great albums. Wonderful Scottish ballad singer, rich voice and guitar with some nice backup. He has made some other great recordings, including "Man With a Rhyme" but this one really shines and you can play it all day. It was never released in the US, probably because of the title, which makes sense in Scotland. ("Gang" just means "go.")    
Béla Fleck Perpetual Motion Sony 2001 There is a Continental Divide in music between "trained" musicians who play classical-type music with incredible skill and dedication but no groove or improvisational skills, and the "untrained" players who often have such great musical skills but you wish they would practice more. I would venture a guess that might piss ome people off that the "untrained" musicians (like me!) who tackle classical-type music generally make a better finished product than "trained" musicians tryng to play bluegrass or blues. And then there is Bela Fleck. You could argue that he is "trained" but he came up through the bluegrass ranks, and as the Boy Wonder banjo player he kind of deserted his fan base and went off to play head-spinning weird jazz banjo with the Wooten Brothers. I doubt that "Perpetual Motion" really made very many bluegrass musicians happy, and I doubt that any classical fans went wild over it either, though they both should have. To tackle a body of music like this (serious classical music), arrange it all for banjo, learn and record it in the middle of non-stop touring is a truly staggering achievement. To hear Bela tackle the hardest of the Bach cello suites, and the Paganini title cut, and to also hear him trade licks with guys like Joshua Bell, John Williams, Edgar Meyer, and Yo-Yo Ma is a tour-de-force of musicianship, and a pleasure to listen to. Believe it ot not, the banjo sounds good on this music, and this is one of those rare records you could listen to with headphones gasping, or just leave on in the background at your dinner party. X X
Big Mama Thornton Ball N' Chain Arhoolie 1968 Her version of "Hound Dog" inspired Elvis's, and she obviously was Janis Joplin's touchstone, though it's amazing that someone this good is not a household word. "My Heavy Load," with Fred McDowell on slide should have been on that spaceship we sent up to communicate with other solar systems. Unlike a lot of great singers who never got the band they deserved, the work that Buddy Guy and Sonny Boy Williamson and Muddy Waters do here is also amazing, though it's still her show.    
Christopher Parkening Parkening Plays Bach Angel 1972? Peerless classical solo guitar. I bought this in high school and still listen to it. The CD has some bonus tracks that were not on the LP I have. If you are a guitarist, watch out, because there are a few overdubbed parts on 2-3 songs that are not listed in the liner notes. It's unfair to have to listen to 2 guitars thinking it is one guitar, since he's so good it's believable that it is just one guitar. Did I say that right?    
Conway Twitty Conway Twitty's Greatest Hits Vol I MCA 1972 Even if you think you don't like country or Conway, this one is awesome from start to finish. I am not wild about any of his other albums. A very soulful album I have had since 1974 and recently found on CD.    
Dave Alvin Blackjack David Hightone 1998 Former singer of the Blasters, this is a very folk, almost traditional-flavored gem. The recording quality is stunning, and Alvin's voice is as rich as they get. I think it got a Grammy a couple years back, and deserved it.    
Dave Mallett Inches and Miles Flying Fish 1976 A re-release of his first 2 albums, and a gem of folk singer-songwriter vein. Great storyteller and singer. He is still writing and performing good stuff, but this one is magical.    
David Francey Torn Screen Door Laker Music 1999 My favorite songwriter since John Prine, whom I first heard in 1972. This album is all new songs, but has a very traditional folk feel. David has an uncanny sense of melody, word rhythm, and can't write a corny line if he tried. And he writes about what he knows and sees, which is refreshing also. I recorded the title cut myself, and plan to do another of his songs on my next CD. His 2nd CD belongs in this list also-- it's called "Far End of Summer" and is also brilliant. Look him up at http://www.davidfrancey.com    
David Wiffen Coast To Coast Fever EMI Canada 1994 on CD (1972 on LP) Among my all-time favorite songwriter albums, and findable on CD after many periods of being out of print. His smoky, supple & mesmerizing voice should have made him famous, and though a few of his songs have become classics (Drivin' Wheel ) he has lived in obscurity for decades. Bruce Cockburn produced this record and played some great stuff on it also.   *
Dick Gaughan Handful of Earth Topic 1989? Scottish guitarist and traditional singer. Perhaps my favorite singer of all time, and one of the unique, powerful and unforgettable voices of the world. Recently available on CD in US. He has a 40 year history and a lot of albums, most of which are good and hard to find, though this one is my favorite all-around, and suggestion as an introduction to the man.    
Dinu Lipatti Bach /Mozart /Scarlatti EMI 1951 This guy was the great lost genius of classical piano. He had a touch and a tone that stand out in a field crowded with talent. He died tragically, and did not record very much, but what there is, we savor. Once you hear him do a piece, you can't be happy with any other version. It's such a shame he was with us for such a short time, and that so few have ever heard of him.    
Doc Watson On Stage Vanguard 1974 A live double-album of Doc and Merle. Incredible singing, picking. A must listen for any acoustic guitar picker. One the recordings that shaped my musical world, and one of the great works of American minstrelsy and guitar picking. Doc is my hero.    
Eric Clapton Just One Night Polydor 1980 A double-CD, recorded live in Japan with Albert Lee on 2nd guitar trading solos with Eric. Every cut on both CD's is great. One of the best rock and roll albums I ever heard, and much better I think than his best-selling stuff.    
Jackson Browne Late For The Sky Elektra/Asylum 1974 This album is over 25 years old, and still sounds as fresh and new as most things. His songwriting, plaintive and powerful vocals, the sound quality, and David Lindley's guitar, lap steel and fiddle work are endlessly moving. I also like his early album "For Everyman."    
Janos Starker JS Bach: Suites for Unaccompanied Cello Philips 1965? Possibly my favorite album of all time. Blows away all other recordings of the cello suites. There is also a version of the same music on Mercury, which has some other Bach sonatas on it that are very nice also. Worth working to find. Either one is great, though I think I like the Philips better for the cello suites. Yo Yo Ma is not fit to shine this guy's shoes on cello. Compare their versions. I dare you.    
Janos Starker The Starker Encore Album Denon 1992 Another fine CD from the master cellist of our time. He won a grammy a couple years ago, so they are re-issuing a lot of his work, and almost all of it is great. His technique and tone surpass anything I have heard, and I find his passion equally outstanding. All other cellists sound wimpy compared to him.    
Jennifer Warnes Famous Blue Raincoat Cypress 1986 An ungodly beautiful voice, great production & sound quality, all Leonard Cohen songs. All songs but one are great.    
Jerry Read Smith The Strayaway Child Song of the Wood 1980 Instrumental, American/Celtic, features hammered dulcimer, with various guitar, fiddle, whistle, etc as backup. A classic. The guy has such a touch and such grace. Hard to find. Try calling 704-669-7675 in North Carolina. Apparently is 1st of a trilogy of albums I don't have.    
Jimmy Bryant & Speedy West Stratosphere Boogie Razor And Tie 1995 The subtitle of this is "The Flaming Guitars" of Jimmy Bryant and Speedy West. Jimmy Bryant was a guitar phenomenon that I wish I had known about earlier. He flatpicked a Telecaster in the early 50's, before effects and even before reverb I think. I also think this album was never released, and sat around for 50 years-- it was some jamming of a bunch of session musicians, so there was no "star" to sell it or tour to support it. Even in this day and age of steroid-enhanced super-pickers, Bryant's body of work is still astounding and pretty much unequalled. The speed, clarity, playfulness and reckless abandon of Jimmy's picking, not to mention the pretty amazing steel guitar work from Speedy West, with whom Jimmy trades licks on this instrumental album, are truly inspiring. Maybe Jimmy was taking speed-- it sounds like the way Jack Kerouac would play Telecaster-- but it's hard to listen to the Sugarfoot Rag without a big grin on your face. I think there are 2 discs of this music, and I wish I had every recording Jimmy ever did and I wish I knew more about him and about why he is a mystery instead of an icon. He should be a household word, and even a lot of guitarists know nothing about him. X  
John Jorgenson Franco American Swing Pharoah 2004 Jorgenson is a guitar god in many categories (Desert Rose Band, Hellecasters, etc. etc. ) but his main thing is Django-style gypsy jazz. His compositions ring as true as the old stuff, and his virtuosic guitar work is always happy and swinging, and never self-indulgent. His command of the guitar is staggering, and he uses his powers only for good, and never plays throwaway riffs and such. Rarely is awe-inspiring technique so well packaged amid pleasant and listenable music. A perfect CD for a party.   *
John Renbourn The Lady and the Unicorn Shanachie 1974? Traditional English instrumental music, mostly solo guitar but some viola + flute. Lovely. Recently re-released on Shanachie in US. He's done a lot of nice things, but this one shines throughout.    
John Williams The Baroque Album CBS 1988 Excellent classical guitar. You usually can't tell one classical guitar player from another, but John has a fire and a tone that stand out. He's always been my favorite classical player, though I am not so wild about his Brazilian explorations. His version of the Rodrigo Concerto di Aranjuez (not on this disc) wails like no other.    
Johnny Winter Third Degree Alligator 1986 Scorching roadhouse rock & roll and blues. Johnny has made some good discs, and done a lot of the same old jamming crap. but this one makes your hair stand up from beginning to end. Some of the best bluesy rock and roll ever recorded. CD "Scorching the Blues" is also good, but not as uniformly & totally as this one.    
Kelly Jo Phelps Lead Me On Burnside 1994 I prefer this one in rotation on a multi-disc changer, since all the songs sound the same. Lap-style blues slide guitar and very soulful singing. Does not sound like anybody I ever heard, but a great sound. He's from Oregon.    
Laurie Lewis Love Chooses You Flying Fish 1989 Laurie is brilliant fiddler, songwriter and singer, and always has a good band. This is my favorite of her many good albums, though it may be out of print now. Great production, picking and harmony singing.    
Leslie Smith These Things Wrapped Waterbug 1995 One of the best of the recent singer-songwriter CD's. I never get tired of this one. Great writing, great voice, nice arrangements and production, all songs great, a very compelling album. Very hard to find. I don't think she tours and may have dropped out of music.   *
Lori Rasmussen The Dawning Of The Day Lorelei Music 1995 My favorite harp celtic CD ever. Simple, not flashy mostly solo, with some viola and cello on a few tracks. Beautifully played, and the best miking quality I ever heard on a harp. And it is SO in tune. Even if you think you don't like celtic harp or harp in general, this is a gem. It may be hard to find.   *
Mary McCaslin Prairie In The Sky Philo 1976 Mary McCaslin made some very nice albums for Philo in the 70's that featured her unique and appealing voice. She was sort of an enligtened hippie chick with some cowgirl in her, some contemporary songwriter, some old-time mountain music background, and a great sense of how to interpret a song. (Her solo frailing banjo version of "Tommy" by The Who is simply awesome.) Prairie in the Sky is a Western-themed group of country and folk songs, with some great singing and some really nice backup playing from Northern guys like Winnie Winston on pedal steel. It's one of those albums you can leave on all afternoon (before shuffled playlists people did this...) and never grow tired of it and never rush over to skip over an annoying song. X  
Michael Jerome Brown Drive On Borealis (Canada) 2001 This guy has got something special. He plays old time blues and slide guitar and banjo with fire and massive tone, and sings & writes as well as anyone. He's been nominated for tons of Canadian awards, but is an obscure guy outside the circles he moves in. I keep meaning to get all his records and I am dying to see him play. This album still blows my mind every time I hear it.   *
Mike Dowling Swamp Dog Blues Orchard 2000 Mike is a little-known master of the guitar, and he is equally at home in jazz,swing, Motown, delta blues and bluegrass. He knows his jazz chords inside out but can fingerpick Blind Blake as good an anybody, and his laid-back but snappy playing, ingenious & classy arrangements and warm vocals put him in the top of his class. He might get the sweetest slide guitar tone of anyone out of an old National guitar, which is saying something. He has made a number of great records, and s a brilliant live show, but this one is his masterpiece so far in my book.   *
Mike Seeger Early Southern Guitar Sounds Folkways 2007 Mike was one of the consummate scholars and players of American roots music, and his ability to play banjo, fiddle, autoharp, harmonica and guitar and sound like old 78's is uncanny. I am not sure that this CD got proper attention when it came out, but it grabbed me more tha anything he ever did. It is sort of a textbook in "early" guitar, and it captures the state of American guitar music during the first phase of the era of recording better than anything I ever heard. Many scholars think that the music that was first put on recordings, between about 1925 and 1935, is vitally important, because it reflected what the true folk process was doing. Almost immediately, people started learning from the radio and records rather than from their families and neighbors, and it is a point well taken. As a musician who learned from radio and reords rather than people, I am not taking sides in the debate. I dont think I ever heard a modern person play those old styles of guitar, and I had almost concluded that times had changed so much that modern people simply could not play like they did in 1925. This assumes of course that Mike Seeger was a "modern person," which is also debatable. X  
Mountain Heart Mountain Heart Doobie Shea 1999 A great first album by a great new Bluegrass band. Every song is good, and the singing, picking and spirit are superlative. Let's hope they stay together and make some more of this stuff.    
Nic Jones Penguin Eggs Topic 1980 Mysterious English ballad singer and voodoo guitarist- recorded in 1980 on Topic in England- recently available in US from Shanachie. His best work, and only one available in US I think. (I have 4 or 5 earlier LP's of his) To my mind this guy is the white Robert Johnson. His guitar playing and singing sound like 3 people, and his version of "Canadee-i-o" is one of the great recordings ever done by a guy with an acoustic guitar. He was badly injured almost 20 years ago in a car accident, and there will be no more Nic Jones recordings.   *
Norman Blake Fields Of November Flying Fish 1974 This was my favorite album in 1974 when it first came out, and one of those where the song order is burned into my memory. Norman is a guitar hero, and there is some of the fiery flatpicking on this album that made us love him, bit it also showed a lot of us the way to know and love the old-time traditional music but also write songs and tunes and put your own spin on the music. Old-time music is dance party music, and it's hard to translate it into concert music, but Norman Blake was one of the first to do it. I get tired of old-time musicians who seem a bit too frantic and all sound kind of the same, and Norman has such a distinctive guitar style and voice that you know it is him in a second. There are some great story songs, very nice mandolin and fiddle and good fingerpicking from Norman, badass crosspicking, plus the original version of "Last Train From Poor Valley" (with the right chords!) and some nice supportive playing from Nancy Blake, Charlie Collins and Tut Taylor. It's not slick enough to be bluegrass, not all X  
Pat Donohue Two Hand Band Blue Sky 1994 Solo fingerstyle ragtime/swing guitar. Almost makes me ill to listen to it he's so good. 612-690-1228. From Minnesota. He plays guitar now on Prairie Home Companion show every week. Good singer/songwriter, too. Has 2 records out on Red House label I think and at least 2 or 3 other good one on this (his own) label. Pat is the greatest fingerpicker who ever lived, and a superb songwriter, singer, and a nice guy, too. Don't know how he does it, or why he is not worshipped world-wide. Don't ever miss a solo concert of his.    
Patty Larkin In The Square Rounder? 1990 In my opinion, Patty is the finest of the modern female troubadours. Her profound and diverse writing, awesome guitar skills, incredible singing, brilliant sense of humor and rock-solid rhythm are unequalled by her peers. This is the only recording she has made that really shows her talents properly. A must-listen for any up and coming female songwriter. How anyone could make a record like this and not be a household word is a mystery.    
Ray Bonneville Rough Luck Fifty Fifty Music 20000 This is one of those great "live in the studio" albums that is easy to enjoy because it is just a guy playing music. Ray is a virtuoso harmonica player who has spent decades playing hardcore blues, who has decided to be a singer-songwriter. He has carved out an interesting niche that reminds me of J.J. Cale, with rock-solid rhythm, a soulful and appealingly gravelly voice, and very catchy songs. It's understated, relaxed, and very powerful, but it makes you feel good. X  
Richard Shindell Sparrow's Point Shanachie 1993 Great folk-style songwriter, with rich voice, deep songs, and good production, one of the real talents of modern singer-sonwriterism. From NYC. His later albums are good also, but I am partial to this one as a brilliant and listenable album.    
Robert Earl Keen West Textures Sugar Hill 1989 This is a 1989 record, but I just got it. There is some great songwriting, and it holds up well under many listenings. He's a fine storytelling songwriter with a voice good enough to listen to but flawed enough to be authentic. Sort of Texas-flavored country/bluegrass production, not too slick.    
Roy Buchanan Roy Buchanan Polydor 1973 Roy's 1st album- and a masterpiece of electric guitar. May be out of print, but worth a try. His recorded output is pretty sparse and unequal, but this is the best single CD to get. When he connects, like he does on several of the cuts here, including "The Messiah Will Come Again", it's the most emotional playing of any instrument by any musician I have ever heard. I bought this record when I was 17 and it blew me away (it actually kept me from playing electric guitar) and still does, maybe more than ever. I am sad I never got to hear him play, though he played for years in a dive in Maryland a couple miles from my family's house. My brother heard him.    
Tara Nevins Mule To Ride Sugar Hill 1999 I first heard Tara Nevins in about 1983 when she was fiddling with an all-girl old-time band from Ithaca NY called the "Heartbeats." I was sure then that she practiced witchcraft, since her fiddling was so powerful, hypnotic and trance-like. Turns out she is a great singer, and song interpreter X X
Third Tyme Out IIIrd Tyme Out Rebel 1991 Their 1st album and so far my favorite, though they are never bad and are a great live band. This might be my favorite bluegrass album of all time, and I have been listening for 30 years to all sorts of bluegrass. Lonesome without being too hick. Great singing. Great everything.    
Todd Hallawell & Robin Kessinger Ear Candy Soundset 2009 This is the kind of record that reminds me why I like guitar records. It's two guys trading licks on an impressive variety of instrumental tunes, and it's a delight. There is just enough in the musical soup of each of the vital ingredients of virtuosity, taste, hard work, fun and good recording quality, The guitars sound fabulous, they play their asses off, it's a cool selection of tunes, with some oddball stuff as well as classic fiddle tunes, and it projects that feeling that I used to know better than I do now of the symbiotic joy that hapopen when two great acoustic guitar pickers get together and take turns playing rhythm for each other. Every student of flastpicking should have this record, and so should a lot of people who could care less what flatpicking is. And of course, Todd is also a National Champion fingerpicker. X  
Troublesome Creek Fast As Time Can Take Me County 2005 Absolutely the best old time string band CD I have ever heard. Not only are the fiddle and banjo fiery and exciting, but the song selection, vocals, driving energy and sound quality are as good as it gets. No scratchy, out of tune fiddling here. Both the male and female lead singers are great, and their harmonies are as good as a bluegrass band, with some nice arranging also.   *
Vern Gosdin The Voice BCH 1999 Maybe the best country album I have heard in 20 years. Incredible singing, and a great band, plus rich and imaginative production. All the songs are good, and 5 or 6 are all-time classics. Too bad for the country music lovers of America that the Nashville business establishment won't get behind music this good.    
Vern Gosdin Super Hits Columbia ?? There is more than one Greatest Hits collection of Vern going around, and one that sounds like it is this one but isn't as good. I got this one in a discount bin at Wal-Mart. He sings old-fashioned country music with the most "been-there" voice there is, but with a slick, great modern production sound. "Chiseled in Stone" and "First Rodeo" are classics. He is George Jones' only competition, which is saying something.    
Washington Phillips Born to Preach the Gospel Yazoo 1991 When they recorded all kinds of people on the street in the 1920's and 30's, they stumbled on some really unusual musicians, and none was any more unusual or compelling than this guy. They only recently found a photo of him, and found out what he was playing (a Dulceola). His voice is so plaintive and rough and sweet it cuts through you unforgettably. He is not really similar to anything you ever heard, whether blues or gospel, but he is a comfort in a crazy world, and his voice rings in my head.    
William (Billy) Jackson St Mungo: A Celtic Suite for Glasgow Greentrax 1990 Found in Scotland. Recorded live with Glasgow symphony- an original work written and performed by harpist William (Billy) Jackson for celtic musicians and orchestra. It's a tour de force bridging the 2 worlds. The Glasgow symphony guys can fiddle just fine, and I can't think of a better example of something that merges celtic and classical music. There is another similar recording of the same sort called the Wellpark Suite, that is easier to find but I don't like it as much. This one is special.   *
Willie Nelson + Ray Price San Antonio Rose Columbia 1980 By far the best of Willie's duet albums. Not a bad song on it. Incredible backup band-- Johnny Gimble, Paul English, Mickey Raphael, Buddy Emmons. Never got much press. Brilliant classic honky tonk country music-- some of the best stuff either of them (or anyone) has ever done in this genre.    
Pat Donohue Two Hand Band Blue Sky 1994 Solo fingerstyle ragtime/swing guitar. Almost makes me ill to listen to it he's so good. From Minnesota. He plays guitar now on Prairie Home Companion show every week. Good singer/songwriter, too. Has 2 records out on Red House label I think and at least 2 or 3 other good one on this (his own) label. Pat is the greatest fingerpicker who ever lived, and a superb songwriter, singer, and a nice guy, too. Don't know how he does it, or why he is not worshipped world-wide. Don't ever miss a solo concert of his.    
Patty Larkin In The Square Rounder? 1990 In my opinion, Patty is the finest of the modern female troubadours. Her profound and diverse writing, awesome guitar skills, incredible singing, brilliant sense of humor and rock-solid rhythm are unequalled by her peers. This is the only recording she has made that really shows her talents properly. A must-listen for any up and coming female songwriter. How anyone could make a record like this and not be a household word is a mystery.    
Richard Shindell Sparrow's Point Shanachie 1993 Great folk-style songwriter, with rich voice, deep songs, and good production, one of the real talents of modern singer-sonwriterism. From NYC. His later albums are good also, but I am partial to this one as a brilliant and listenable album.    
Robert Earl Keen West Textures Sugar Hill ?? This is a 1989 record, but I just got it. There is some great songwriting, and it holds up well under many listenings. He's a fine storytelling songwriter with a voice good enough to listen to but flawed enough to be authentic. Sort of Texas-flavored country/bluegrass production, not too slick.    
Roy Buchanan Roy Buchanan Polydor 1973 Roy's 1st album- and a masterpiece of electric guitar. May be out of print, but worth a try. His recorded output is pretty sparse and unequal, but this is the best single CD to get. When he connects, like he does on several of the cuts here, including "The Messiah Will Come Again", it's the most emotional playing of any instrument by any musician I have ever heard. I bought this record when I was 17 and it blew me away (it actually kept me from playing electric guitar) and still does, maybe more than ever. I am sad I never got to hear him play, though he played for years in a dive in Maryland a couple miles from my family's house. My brother heard him.    
Third Tyme Out IIIrd Tyme Out Rebel 1991 Their 1st album and so far my favorite, though they are never bad and are a great live band. This might be my favorite bluegrass album of all time, and I have been listening for 30 years to all sorts of bluegrass. Lonesome without being too hick. Great singing. Great everything.    
Troublesome Creek Fast As Time Can Take Me County 2005 Absolutely the best old time string band CD I have ever heard. Not only are the fiddle and banjo fiery and exciting, but the song selection, vocals, driving energy and sound quality are as good as it gets. No scratchy, out of tune fiddling here. Both the male and female lead singers are great, and their harmonies are as good as a bluegrass band, with some nice arranging also. X *
Vern Gosdin The Voice BCH 1999 Maybe the best country album I have heard in 20 years. Incredible singing, and a great band, plus rich and imaginative production. All the songs are good, and 5 or 6 are all-time classics. Too bad for the country music lovers of America that the Nashville business establishment won't get behind music this good.    
Vern Gosdin Super Hits Columbia ?? There is more than one Greatest Hits collection of Vern going around, and one that sounds like it is this one but isn't as good. I got this one in a discount bin at Wal-Mart. He sings old-fashioned country music with the most "been-there" voice there is, but with a slick, great modern production sound. "Chiseled in Stone" and "First Rodeo" are classics. He is George Jones' only competition, which is saying something.    
Washington Phillips Born to Preach the Gospel Yazoo 1991 When they recorded all kinds of people on the street in the 1920's and 30's, they stumbled on some really unusual musicians, and none was any more unusual or compelling than this guy. They only recently found a photo of him, and found out what he was playing (a Dulceola). His voice is so plaintive and rough and sweet it cuts through you unforgettably. He is not really similar to anything you ever heard, whether blues or gospel, but he is a comfort in a crazy world, and his voice rings in my head.    
William (Billy) Jackson St Mungo: A Celtic Suite for Glasgow Greentrax 1990 Found in Scotland. Recorded live with Glasgow symphony- an original work written and performed by harpist William (Billy) Jackson for celtic musicians and orchestra. It's a tour de force bridging the 2 worlds. The Glasgow symphony guys can fiddle just fine, and I can't think of a better example of something that merges celtic and classical music. There is another similar recording of the same sort called the Wellpark Suite, that is easier to find but I don't like it as much. This one is special.   *
Willie Nelson + Ray Price San Antonio Rose Columbia 1980 By far the best of Willie's duet albums. Not a bad song on it. Incredible backup band-- Johnny Gimble, Paul English, Mickey Raphael, Buddy Emmons. Never got much press. Brilliant classic honky tonk country music-- some of the best stuff either of them (or anyone) has ever done in this genre.    

 


WOODPECKER MULTIMEDIA
PO Box 815 York Maine 03909  USA
phone (207) 363-1886


About Harvey Reid Concert Schedule Catalog of Recordings
Listen to Audio Video Booking Information
Buy From Us Reviews Interviews
Newest Recording Newsletter Hot News
Harvey's Gear The Song Train About the Partial Capo
Articles & Essays Out of Print Music Books
Downloads Publicity Info Favorite CD's
What's Here Publicity Photos Guitar Tunings
About Joyce Andersen Lyrics History
Say Hello to Us Home  

About this Web Site & What's New Here | Hot News | Woodpecker Home Page | About Harvey Reid |The Song Train | Video | Audio | About Joyce Andersen | Books by Harvey Reid |Say hello to us... |Catalog of CD's and Tapes | Concert & Record Reviews | Interviews with HR | Harvey Reid Concert Schedule | Special Events | HR's Newest Recording | Lyrics to Harvey Reid Songs | Harvey Reid Annual Newsletters | HR's Guitar Tunings | About the Partial Capo | Articles & Essays by HR | HR's Gear | HR's Favorite CD's | HR's Career History | Booking Info | Publicity Info & Download Files |


This web site concerns the music and life of acoustic musician Harvey Reid.

If you don't find what you want, or if you have comments or questions, please email to